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The Pensieve - Masoud Kalali's Blog

My personla blog where I share notes and thoughts about software technology landscape. Covering subjects ranging from tech strategy, leadership, software architecture, cloud native, and software development in general.

Brief overview of JSR 343: JavaTM Message Service 2.0

Well, as many of us already know Oracle submitted the JSR for Java EE 7 which is sort of an umbrella JSR for many update in already existing specifications, new versions of some JSRs and some completely new JSRs which will be part of the grand Java EE 7 - JSR 342. One of these JSRs is the JSR 343 which introduces a new version of JMS into the platform as an evolution of its previous version, JSR-914, and will unify the JMS usage with what added to the platform in the past 8 years.

Writing Solaris Service Management Facility (SMF) service manifest

SMF services are basically daemons staying in background and waiting for the requests which they should server, when the request come the daemon wake ups, serve the request and then wait for the next request to come. The services are building using software development platforms and languages but they have one common aspect which we are going to discuss here. The service manifests which describe the service for the SMF and let the SMF manage and understand the service life cycle.

Solaris fault administration using fmadm command

In this article we will study how we can use the fmadm command to get the list of faulty components along with the detailed information about the fault. Before starting this article we should have a command console open and then we can proceed with using the fmadm command. The most basic form of using fmadm command is using its faulty subcommand as follow 1 \# fmadm faulty When we have no error in the system, this command will not show anything and exit normally but with a faulty component the output will be different, for example in the following sample we have a faulty ZFS pool because some of its underlying devices are missing.

Monitoring ZFS pools performance using zpool iostat

Performance, performance, performance; this is what we hear in all software development and management sessions. ZFS provides few utility commands to monitor one or more pools’ performance. You should remember that we used fsstat command to monitor the UFS performance metrics. We can use iostat subcommand of the zpool command to monitor the performance metrics of ZFS pools. The iostat subcommand provides some options and arguments which we can see in its syntax shown below: 1 iostat \[-v\] \[pool\] .

Managing Logical network interfaces in Solaris

Like other operating system we can assign multiple IP address to a network interface. This secondary address are called logical interfaces and we can use them to make one machine with one single network interface own multiple IP addresses for different purposes. We may need to assign multiple IP address to an interface to make it available to both internal and external networks or for testing purposes. We should have one network interface configured in our system in order to create additional logical interfaces.

Configuring Solaris Link Aggregation (Ethernet bonding)

Link aggregation or commonly known Ethernet bonding allows us to enhance the network availability and performance by combining multiple network interfaces together and form an aggregation of those interface_names which act as a single network interface with greatly enhanced availability and performance. When we aggregate two or more network interfaces, we are forming a new network interface on top of those physical interfaces combined in the link layer. We need to have at least two network interfaces in our machine to create a link aggregation.